Monday, March 28, 2022

The FRANK SINATRA COOKBOOK Recipes

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The FRANK SINATRA COOKBOOK




GRANDMA BELLINO'S COOKBOOK

The CLOSTEST THING to a TRUE FRANK SINATRA COOKBOOK


The Sinatra Family Cookbook? Well, not exactly, just the closest thing to it.  There was actually a book called The Celebrity Cookbook, and it was so incrediably awful that it's criminal. How can anyone who was colaborating with Frank Sinatra, on a so-called cookbook produce utter garbage. You don;t even know who wrote the book. There's no listing of an author, just that it's Barbara SInatra and Friends. Was she the author. No doubt there was a book editor who put the thing together. Whoever the people are that had the incrediable opportunity to work on a cookbook with Frank Sinatra and do such a God Awful job of it, those people should be arrested and thrown in jail. The book is absolutely horrible. You have the great subject of Frank Sinatra, and the food he liked to eat, it there are no stories or elaborations of Sinatra Family Meals, dining out, nor any history or facts at all. Not even a single sentence. This is without a doubt one of the greatest crimes incookbook, and publishing history of all time. It's so horrible, it's almost unbelievable, but it actually happened. Barbara Sinatra and the people who helped her, produced one of the worst peices of crap ever to be puiblished, in the form of The Frank Sinatra Celebrity Cookbook. What a crime.

Well, sad to say, t there is not much written on Franks Sinatra eating habits, dishes his father Marty made, and his mother Dolly. Thouhg it is said that Marty Sinatra was the better cook, and cooked most of the family meals, which would have been Sicilian, and dishes from Marty (Saverio Martino) whoe was born in Lercara Friddi Sicily,  before his family immigrated to New York in 1903 ...

Those people, Barbara Sinatra and Friends had a chance to write something great, but failed miserably.  They had a chance to talk to Frank, get all the stories of Frank Sinatra, the foods he loved, what his father and mother cooked, as well as dining adventures in New York, Chicago, 
Los Angeles,  Italy, all around American and the World. The did not even write one paragraph, not even one sentence on anything. Again it's an absolute crime that the people behind this book were ever given the go ahead.

Anyway, since those people failed so terribly, the closest thing we can find, other than a few tidbits in magazine articles here and there, the best thing we could find, as far as a cookbook and Frank Sinatra, food and Italian and Sicilian Recipes, is a book by Daniel Bellino Zwicke, called Grandma Bellino's Italian Cookbook - Recipes From My Sicilian Grandmother. The authors maternal grandparents, his grandfather Philipo Bellino and his nonna Giuseppina Salemi Bellino of Lercara Friddi, Sicily, the same town that both Charles "Lucjy" Luciano and Frank Sinatra's father 
Saverio Antonino Martino Sinatra was born. Martino (Marty) learned how to cook the Sicilian dishes of Lecara Friddi from his mother and a couple of his aunts. Marty was quite the cook, and cooked most of the Sinatra Family meals that young Frank and Dolly Sinatra ate. Dishes like : Eggplant Caponata, Ziti al Forno (with Meatballs), Timballo d' Agneletti, Zuppa di Lentichie, and various pasta, soup, Chicken, MEat and Fish recipes. We found the recipes from these dishes, the same that Marty SInatra cooked for his wife and son Francis Albert, in Grandma Bellino's Italian Cookbook.

So ther you go. If you want to know a bit about Frank Sinatra, and the Sicilian Food that he like to eat, get Grandma Bellino's Italian Cookbook, what we like to call The Sinatra Family Cookbook. It's the best you can do. So get a copy, ook some recipes, put on some Sinatra albums, sit down at the table, and "Eat Like Frank."






The SINATRA CELEBRITY COOKBOOK

BARBARA SINATRA & FRIENDS

"IT'S a CRIME THIS BOOK Was EVER PUBLISHED"

SOrry to say, but This BOOK is ABSOLUTELY TERRIBLE !!!

Witha CAPITAL "T"

So UNWORTHY of The LATE GREAT FRANCIS ALBERT SINATRA


"BASTA" !!!








ABOUT FRANK


                Frank Sinatra, both the greatest singer and greatest entertainer of the 20th Century. No question. Sinatra was a legendary icon whose star still shines bright. He was a musical icon, celebrity, international personality, and to millions of Italian-Americans he was our own, a paisan

Frank was an Italian-American whose ancestry is from Genoa on his mother's side of the family and Sicilian on his father's side. And being Italian, Frank loved the food he grew up with, Dolly made a mean Marianara Sauce as well as Meatballs and the all-time Italian-American favorite Sunday Sauce (aka Gravy). Frank loved the food of his childhood; the Spaghetti & Meatballs, Stuffed Artichokes, Pasta Fazool, Frittata, Eggplant Parmigiana and all the usual suspects of the Italian-American table. 

It's a well known fact that Frank's favorite restaurant was Patsy's on 56th Street in New York ... When Frank went to Patsy's his favorite dishes were Calms Posillipo and Veal Milanese with a nice plate of Spaghetti Pomodoro in-between, and maybe a slice of Cheesecake to finish if Frank was in the mood.





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FRANK and AVA

"MANGIA BENE"




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FRANK'S FAVORITE RESTAURANT

Patsy's 56th Street, NEW YORK, NY



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VEAL MILANESE and CLAMS POSILLIPO .. Two of FRANK'S Favorites



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CLAMS POSILLIPO

"One of FRANK'S FAVORITES" !



SICILIAN FOOD RECIPES

FROM LERCARA FRIDDI

The SAME TOWN as The SINATRA FAMILY

SICILY



GRANDMA BELLINO'S COOKBOOK

The CLOSEST THING to a SINATRA  COOKBOOK

With RECIPES FROM SINATRA'S HOME TOWN in SICILY

SOUPS - PASTA _ EGGPLANT - ARTICHOKES & MORE

All of FRANK SINATRA'S FAVORITE ITALIAN FOODS








    



FRANK SINATRA

RAT PACK





 




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GINO'S on Lexington Avenue was a Sinatra favorite ..



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A waiter and the famed Zebra Wallpaper of Gino's ..

GINO'S "SECRTE SAUCE" SALSA SEGRETO












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Learn How to Make SUNDAY SAUCE alla SINATRA





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VISITING NEW YORK NEW YORK


ANYWHERE WORLDWIDE






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Veal Sinatra alla Milanese Recipe

 



VEAL MILANESE

alla SINATRA



VEAL MILANESE alla FRANK

RECIPE :

2 cups plain Breadcrumbs
2 Tbsp freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
Pinch of oregano
¼ cup minced flat-leaf parsley
1 cup plus 3 Tbsp olive oil
¼ tsp salt
⅛ tsp freshly ground black pepper
½ cup all-purpose flour
2 large eggs, beaten
8 veal cutlets (about 1¼ pounds), pounded thin to slightly less than ¼ inch
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 lemon cut into 8 wedges


 Break or cut the bread into large chunks and place in a food processor. Process until the bread is reduced to fine crumbs. Transfer the crumbs to a large bowl and stir in the cheese, oregano and parsley. Gradually add 3 tablespoons of oil, stirring, until thoroughly combined. Season with salt and pepper.

2. Spread the flour on a large plate, place the eggs in a shallow bowl, and spread the seasoned bread crumbs on a second large plate. Coat each veal cutlet in the flour, then the beaten eggs, and then the bread crumbs, patting with the palm of your hand to ensure adhesion.

3. Heat 1 cup of the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat (to a frying temperature of 350 F) and sauté the veal for 2 minutes. Turn and sauté for 1 additional minute. Do not crowd pan. If necessary, fry the cutlets in batches. Remove with a slotted spatula and drain on paper towels. Season to taste with salt and pepper, and serve with lemon wedges.





GRANDMA BELLINO'S ITALIAN COOKBOOK

aka The SINATRA FAMILY COOKBOOK





Thursday, March 17, 2022

SINATRA Eggpalnt Parmigiana Recipe

 



SINATRA EATS

With AVA GARDNER

PATSY'S NEW YORK






EGGPLANT PARMIGIANA Recipe

alla GIANNI

alla SINATRA


Frank Sinatra loved his Italian Food. Dishes his mom and dad made. And, most do not know, but
it was Fran Sinatra's Dad MArty who cooked most of the food in the Sinatra home in Hoboken, New Jersey. Yes, Frank's Dad. His mother Dolly cooked as well, but Marty was actually the better cook, and he cooked many of young Frankie's favorite dishes, like Sunday Sauce Gravy, Meatballs, and Melenzane Parmigiana, aka Eggplant Parmigiana, one of Franks all-time favorite Italian dishes.

Marty (Saverio Martino Antonino Sianatra) was from the Sicilian town of Lercara Friddi, Sicily. In Italy, the two places where they eat more Eggplant than other places in Italy, are Sicily, and Naples and its surrounding area, like Positano, and all along the Amalfi Coast.

"Cucina, e Mangia Bene"








RECIPES FROM MY SICILIAN NONNA

by DANIEL BELLINO ZWICKE

WHOSE FAMILY Was FROM LERCARA FRIDDI

JUST LIKE SINATRA 'S FAMILY

RECIPE  EGGPLANT PARMIGIAN

MACCHERONI PASTA and MORE







EGGPLANT PARMIGIANA








YOUR DAILY COFFEE





FRANK SINATRA

"COME FLY with ME"









Wednesday, February 23, 2022

Sinatra is Sicilian Sicily

 




"FRANKIE"

Francis Albert Sinatra



A Family from Sicily


Io sono Siciliano . . .” I am Sicilian.


At the age of seventy-one, in the broiling heat of summer in 1987, Frank Sinatra was singing, not so well by that time, in the land of his fathers. “I want to say,” he told a rapt audience at Palermo’s Favorita Stadium, “that I love you dearly for coming tonight. I haven’t been in Italy for a long time—I’m so thrilled. I’m very happy.”

The crowd roared approval, especially when he said he was Sicilian, that his father was born in Sicily. Sinatra’s voice cracked a little as he spoke, and he looked more reflective than happy. At another concert, in the northern Italian city of Genoa, he had a joke for his audience. “Two very important and wonderful people came from Genoa,” he quipped. “One . . . Uno: Christopher Columbus. Due: mia Mamma . . .”

This second crowd cheered, too, though a little less enthusiastically when he mentioned that his father was Sicilian. “I don’t think,” he said wryly, “that they’re too thrilled about Sicilia.” It was a nod to northern Italians’ feelings about the island off the southernmost tip of the country. They look down on its people as backward and slothful, and because, as all the world knows, it is synonymous with organized crime. It is the island of fire and paradox, the dismembered foot of the leg of Italy. Sicily: at ten thousand square miles the largest island in the Mediterranean, a cornucopia of history that remains more remote and mysterious than anywhere in Europe.

The island’s story has been a saga of violence. Its ground heaved to earthquakes, and its volcanoes spat fire and lava, long before Christ. Its population carries the genes of Greeks and Romans, of Germanic Vandals and Arabs, of Normans and Spaniards, all of them invaders who wrote Sicily’s history in blood.

“Sicily is ungovernable,” Luigi Barzini wrote. “The inhabitants long ago learned to distrust and neutralize all written laws.” Crime was endemic, so alarmingly so that a hundred years ago the island’s crime rate was said to be the worst in Europe. By then, the outside world had already heard the spectral name that has become inseparable from that of the island—Mafia.

The origin of that word is as much a mystery as the criminal brotherhood itself, but in Sicily “mafia” has one meaning and “Mafia”—with an upper case “M”—another. For the islanders, in Barzini’s view, the word “mafia” was originally used to refer to “a state of mind, a philosophy of life, a concept of society, a moral code.” At its heart is marriage and the family, with strict parameters. Marriage is for life, divorce unacceptable and impossible.

A man with possessions or special skills was deemed to have authority, and known as a padrone. In “mafia” with a small “m,” those who lived by the code and wielded power in the community were uomini rispettati, men of respect. They were supposed to behave chivalrously, to be good family men, and their word was their bond. They set an example, and they expected to be obeyed.

The corruption of the code and the descent to criminality was rapid. Well before the dawn of the twentieth century, the Mafia with a capital “M,” though never exactly an organization, was levying tribute from farmers, controlling the minimal water supply, the builders and the businessmen, fixing prices and contracts.

Cooperation was enforced brutally. Those who spoke out in protest were killed, whatever their station in life. The Mafia made a mockery of the state, rigging elections, corrupting the politicians it favored, and terrorizing opponents. From 1860 to 1924, not a single politician from Sicily was elected to the Italian parliament without Mafia approval. The island and its people, as one early visitor wrote, were “not a dish for the timid.”

Frank Sinatra’s paternal grandfather grew up in Sicily in the years that followed the end of foreign rule, a time of social and political mayhem. His childhood and early adult years coincided with the collapse of civil authority, brutally suppressed uprisings, and the rise of the Mafia to fill the power vacuum.

Beyond that, very little has been known about the Sinatra family’s background in Sicily. The grandfather’s obituary, which appeared in the New York Times because of his famous grandson, merely had him born “in Italy” in 1884 (though his American death certificate indicates he was born much earlier, in 1866). Twice, in 1964 and in 1987, Frank Sinatra told audiences that his family had come from Catania, about as far east as one can go in Sicily. Yet he told one of his musicians, principal violist Ann Barak, that they came from Agrigento on the southwestern side of the island. His daughter Nancy, who consulted her father extensively while working on her two books about his life, wrote that her great-grandfather had been “born and brought up” in Agrigento. His name, according to her, was John.

In fact he came from neither Catania nor Agrigento, was born earlier than either of the dates previously reported, and his true name was Francesco—in the American rendering, Frank.

Sicilian baptismal and marriage records, United States immigration and census data, and interviews with surviving grandchildren establish that Francesco Sinatra was born in 1857 in the town of Lercara Friddi, in the hills of northwest Sicily. It had about ten thousand inhabitants and it was a place of some importance, referred to by some as piccolo Palermo, little Palermo.

The reason was sulfur, an essential commodity in the paper and pharmaceutical industries, in which Sicily was rich and Lercara especially so. Foreign companies reaped the profits, however, and most locals languished in poverty. The town was located, in the words of a prominent Italian editor, in “the core territory of the Mafia.” The town lies fifteen miles from Corleone, a name made famous by The Godfather and in real life a community credited with breeding more future American mafiosi than any other place in Sicily. It is just twelve miles from the Mafia stronghold of Prizzi—as in Prizzi’s Honor, the Richard Condon novel about the mob and the film based on it that starred Jack  Nicholson.

It was Lercara Friddi, however, that produced the most notorious mafioso of the twentieth century. Francesco Sinatra’s hometown spawned Lucky Luciano. Luciano was “without doubt the most important Italian-American gangster,” according to one authority, and “head of the Italian underworld throughout the land,” according to a longtime head of the Chicago Crime Commission. One of his own lawyers described him as having been, quite simply, “the founder of the modern Mafia.”

Luciano, whose real name was Salvatore Lucania, was born in Lercara Friddi in 1897. Old marriage and baptismal registers show that his parents and Francesco Sinatra and his bride, Rosa Saglimbeni, were married at the church of Santa Maria della Neve within two years of each other. Luciano was baptized there, in the same font as Francesco’s first two children.

In all the years of speculation about Frank Sinatra’s Mafia links, this coincidence of origin has remained unknown. Other new information makes it very likely that the Sinatras and the Lucanias knew each other. The two families lived on the same short street, the Via Margherita di Savoia, at roughly the same time. Luciano’s address book, seized by law enforcement authorities on his death in 1962 and available today in the files of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, contains only two entries for individuals who lived in Lercara Friddi: one a member of his own family and the other a man named Saglimbeni, a relative of the woman Francesco Sinatra married. Even if the Sinatras and the Lucanias did not know each other, Luciano’s later notoriety makes it certain that the Sinatra family eventually learned that they and the gangster shared the same town of origin. Kinship and origins are important in Italian-American culture, and were even more so in the first decades of the diaspora.

As a boy, Frank Sinatra could have learned from any of several older relatives that his people and Luciano came from the same Sicilian town. He certainly should have learned it from Francesco, who lived with Sinatra’s family after his wife’s death and often minded his grandson when the boy’s parents were out.

Francesco, moreover, survived to the age of ninety-one, until long after Luciano had become an infamous household name and Frank Sinatra an internationally famous singer. Sinatra himself indicated, and a close contemporary confirmed, that he and his grandfather were “very close.” Late in life, he said he had gone out of his way to “check back” on his Sicilian ties. And yet, as we have seen, he muddied the historical waters by suggesting that his forebears came from Sicilian towns far from Lercara Friddi

That the Sinatra family came from the same town as a top mafioso was not in itself a cause for embarrassment. The reason for the obfuscation, though, may be found in the family involvement with bootlegging in Frank Sinatra’s childhood and, above all, in his own longtime relationship with Luciano himself, the extent of which can now be documented for the first time.





RECIPES FROM MY 

SICILIAN NONNA



Sunday, February 6, 2022

SINATRA PAVAROTTI Tee Shirt

 







FRANK SINATRA & LUCIANO PAVAROTTI










The Two GREATEST SINGERS

Of The 2oth CENTURY


Wednesday, January 26, 2022

Frank Sinatra - Come Fly with Me

 



Frank Sinatra 

"COME FLY with ME"






"SINATRA"







SINATRA

"COME FLY with ME








FRANK SINATRA

"COME FLY with ME"







SUNDAY SAUCE

alla SINATRA