Wednesday, July 27, 2022

Frank Sinatra Favorite Songs

 
 
EVERYTHING HAPPENS to ME
 
 
 
This is one of my all-time favorite of the many great albums by The Chairman of The Board, Mr. Francis Albert Sinatra. My good friend Jimmy Starace gave this to me for a Birthday present one year and I've loved this wonderful Sinatra Album ever since. The album comprises songs that were Frank Sinatra's best loved songs. His daughter Tina had the idea of producing album of songs that her father Frank Sinatra recorded that were his own personal favorites. Tina asked her father to pick these songs, and the album Everything Happens to Me was born. If you've never listed to the album and I'm sure you'll agree that this collection of Mr. Sinatra singing his favorite songs is a beautiful and poignant one.
This is one of the most interesting and successful Frank Sinatra collections out there. Everything Happens to Me avoids the obvious hits and collects a number of the finest ballads and torch songs that Sinatra cut while at Reprise Records during the '60s, '70s, and early '80s. It's a regal collection that concentrates on the darker side of Sinatra's art. Instead of celebrating a cross section of the Voice's career the way that so many compilations do, the album sounds like an elegy and has a strange cohesiveness considering that it's drawn up from material that stretches over a 20-year period. Sinatra had recorded the title track numerous times throughout his career, but the previously unreleased version included here (complete with new lyrics) is his darkest and most battle-scarred interpretation. Even considering its lighter moments ("The Second Time Around" and the lyrically downbeat but wondrously swinging "Summer Wind"), this is a stark collection that almost plays like an original concept album about confronting disappointment, loneliness, and ultimately, mortality. That's a lot to ask casual fans to embrace, but Everything Happens to Me ends up giving listeners who only know of the swinging Rat Packer more than a glimpse of the complexity and depth behind Frank Sinatra's art.
 
 
 
 
 
 
FRANK
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9HfWEB38Ow?feature=player_embedded]
EVERYTHING HAPPENS to ME
 
 
The TITLE SONG of The Album of The Same Name
 
 
This Collections of SONGS were FRANK SINATRA'S 
 
FAVORITE SONGS THAT HE RECORDED
 
Learn How to Make
 
SUNDAYS SAUCE alla SINATRA
 
alla BELLINO
 
The RECIPE Is In SUNDAY SAUCE 
 
by DANIEL BELLINO "Z"
 
 
A FELLOW SICILIAN-AMERICAN of FRANK SINATRA 'S
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Saturday, July 9, 2022

SInatra Live Concert Vegas

 




Francis Albert Sinatra







FRANK SINATRA

Live at CAESARS PALACE

LAS VEGAS

1978


LADY is a TRAMP  13:55

SOMEONE to WATCH OVER ME  19:10

SALOON SONGS MEDLEY  31:20







Frank Fixes his Drink

Backstage at Caesars Palace





JACK DANIELS on The ROCKS






Frank sips some JD





Frank straigthens his TUX






"Ready to Go"

Backstage at CAEARS PALACE

LAS VEGAS ,  NEVADA







SUNDAY SAUCE

alla SINATRA









FRANK





SINATRA






SINATRA

"Ah SALUTE" !!!










Frank Sinatra

Singing SOMEONE to WATCH OVER ME

by George & Ira Gerschwin

Caesars Palace 1978






The SANDS

HOTEL & CASINO

The Sands Hotel And Casino in 1959. Sinatra’s preferred venue during his early tenure in Vegas, he recorded the iconic ‘Sinatra At The Sands’ album here

The Sands Hotel And Casino was Sinatra’s preferred venue for many years (it was also where he recorded the classic live album, Sinatra At The Sands, for his own label, Reprise, in 1966), though in 1967 he changed his allegiance and began a long relationship with the newer and more grandiose Caesars Palace, a hotel and casino complex aesthetically inspired by ancient Rome.




CAEARS PALACE

Las Vegas


Looking at the footage today, we can see that Sinatra, then 62, was in great shape, both physically and vocally. We first glimpse him backstage preparing for the show while comedian Jackie Gayle is out front doing a warm-up act. Suntanned and smartly dressed in a tuxedo, Sinatra – with a glass of Jack Daniel’s in his hand – is laughing and seemingly without a care in the world as he chats happily with some of his entourage and poses for photos.

That same sense of relaxation pervades Sinatra’s performance, reflecting someone who’s self-assured and for whom singing in public is as natural and effortless as breathing. In front of hundreds of people, Sinatra is in his element, combining his gift for making lyrics come alive with a legendary onstage charisma that made women want to be with him and men want to be like him.






Frank Sinatra

Sings - The GAL THAT GOT AWAY

Written by Arold Arlen and Ira Gerschwin

Arrangement by Nelson Riddle





SINATRA on STAGE

with JACK DANIELS




Las Vegas

1978






Frank Sinatra

Drinking JACK DANIELS

"Ah SALUTE" !!!


































Saturday, July 2, 2022

Frank Drinks JD




Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr, and Frank Sinatra

Frank pours a Drink. Jack Daniels on the Rocks.




JACK DANIELS FRANK'S WAY

RECIPE :

2 Fingers of Jack Daniels Tennessee Whiskey (2 ounces)
3 Ice Cubes
Water, just a Splash

Fill a Rock Glass with a measurement that equals 2 Fingers (2  ounces) in height of Jack Daniels Tennessee Whiskey.

Add 3 Ice Cubes. 

Add a splash of water, and "Drink Up" as Frank would say.



On JACK DANIELS

Many people think Jack Daniels is Bourbon, and many say it is not Bourbon. Technically, Jack Daniels is Bourbon Whiskey, but the makers of Jack Daniels chose not to call it Bourbon, and have labeled it Tennessee Whiskey to create a unique, site specific identity. 









The RAT PACK

FRANK SAMMY & DINO

DRINKING JACK DANIELS



"GET YOURS TODAY" !!!




 

Thursday, June 30, 2022

Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Sinatra - ALL My TOMORROWS

.  

.
"All My Tomorrows" is a 1959 ballad with lyrics by Sammy Cahn and music by Jimmy Van Heusen .    The song was expressly written as a Frank Sinatra vehicle.  It was introduced in the film A Hole in the Head where Sinatra sings it in the opening credits.
Sinatra later featured "All My Tomorrows" on his 1961 album All the Way. Sinatra re-recorded it for his 1969 album MY WAY , in a new arrangement which Charles L. Granata considers to be superior to the original, and which AllMusic calls "lush and aching". Rolling Stone describes the song as "the poignant monologue of a man determined to turn his life around".


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"ALL MY TOMORROWS"


Francis Albert Sinatra


"All My Tomorrow Belong to You"


Listen to The Master at Work. Francis Albert Sinatra, the greatest singer of the 20th Century.
There is no one in the 21st Century, a Century of Crappy Music and Crappy Musicians (so-called) to campare to the great Frank Sinatra, not only the greatest singer of The 20th Century, but one of
the greatest singers of all-time. Listen to Sinatra sing this beautiful song written for him by the
great songwriters Jimmy Van Heusen and Sammy Cahn.

Sinatra's voice was in impeccable instrument, which hi conveys most masterfully in this wonderful song. And the musical composition and arrangement of the song is stunning, with lovely Violins, Flute, Harp,  and an expert orchestra, made up of top-notch professional musicians. Listen, savor the music, and enjoy one the greats, Mr Francis Albert Sinatra. It doesn't get any better than this. We're sure you'll agree.



.


"I Was at This Concert"

One of the Greatest Times of My Life

I Talk About This Concert Quite Often


.


SUNDAY SAUCE

alla SINATRA







.

 

Monday, June 20, 2022

Frank Sinatra Cars Collection

 



Frank Sinatra

1955 Ford Thunderbird




Frank Sinatra

1956 Lincoln Continental Mark II


In 1956, the Continental Mark II was a vehicle of luxury and it was twice as expensive as a Cadillac. Since Ford still lost money on every one sold, they were very exclusive.







Franks SInatra's 1958 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham


Frank Sinatra’s sizzling 1958 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham sold through Bonhams to its 5th owner in 2009. The Rat Pack King’s Caddy was made as one of only 700 built.

 The Eldorado Brougham, a $13,074 dream machine that was one of the most luxurious, exclusive, and advanced cars in the world. With space-age features like a self-leveling air suspension, power seats with memory, dual-level climate control, and cruise control, the Caddy was in many ways decades ahead of the competition. With only 304 cars built in ’58, it was the car to have in the late 50s. Sinatra loved them so much that he owned several, with one appearing alongside him in 1960s’ Ocean’s Eleven. Bonham’s sold one ex-Sinatra Brougham in 2009 for an undisclosed sum. 







Frank Sinatra's 1961 DUAL GHIA

His Pal Dean Martin owned One Too


With Chrysler running gear and a hand-built body made in Italy by Ghia, the $13,500 L6.4 was one of the most exclusive cars in the world, with just 26 produced – and most of them going to celebrities. Despite their price and exclusivity, there was something off about Sinatra’s car. He had celebrity customizer George Barris install a number of fail-safe components, including a backup fuel pump and brake circuits. Today, just 17 of the cars survive.







"You buy a Ferrari when you want to be somebody. 
You buy a Lamborghini when you are somebody." 

...  Frank Sinatra ....





Frank Sinatra's 1969 Lamborgini  Miura

The Miura is generally accepted as the World’s first Supercar, and it was impressive enough for Sinatra to take notice. So on December 12, 1969 – his 54th birthday – he treated himself to one. Personally ordered at Lamborghini’s Sant ‘Agata Bolognese headquarters, Sinatra ordered his mid-engined V12 Lambo in arancio metallico (orange being his favorite color) with a wild boarskin leather interior. 

Sinatra was so taken with his car that he allegedly said “You buy a Ferrari when you want to be somebody. You buy a Lamborghini when you are somebody.” Sinatra’s love affair with his Miura was short-lived, however. Within a few years, he had given it to a girlfriend, who quickly traded it in on a newer Countach. 






1975 British Racing Green Jaguar XJS


In 1975, Sinatra married for a fourth and final time to Barbara Marx. As part of their wedding, the two exchanged cars; Frank giving her a Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow with paint to match his eyes, and receiving a British racing green XJS.








FRANK & JACK






Frank and His T-BIRD





1942 CHRYSLER NEW YORKER









SUNDAY SAUCE

alla SINATRA















Ray Liotta iN Frank Sinatra Car Jay Leno

 




Frank Sinatra's DUAL GHIA




Remembering RAY LIOTTA





Ray Liotta with Jay Leno

JAY'S GARAGE

In FRANK SINATRA'S 1961 DUAL GHIA







Frank Sinatra's 1961 Dual Ghia



Frank Sinatra’s very own 1961 Dual Ghia L.6.4 Hardtop will be featured at the 2019 Las Vegas Concours d'Elegance taking place October 25-28. The vehicle will be heading down from the National Automobile Museum in Reno, Nev. for the inaugural event.

The Dual Ghia began production using a Dodge Firebomb V-8 engine and Dodge chassis. The Dodge chassis were shipped to Torino, Italy, to be shortened and fitted with Ghia bodywork in convertible form, under the name Ghia L.6.4. Upon completion in Detroit, Michigan, Dual Ghia then hand-picked the driver, Frank Sinatra. 

After purchasing the vehicle, Sinatra later personalized it even further and hired designer, George Barris, to make cosmetic changes including flush headlamps, wire wheels, a stereo and CB radio. The $15,000 L.6.4 was one of the most exclusive cars in the world, with just 26 produced. Today, only 17 of the cars survive.









SUNDAY SAUCE

WHEN ITALIAN-AMERICANS COOK

LASAGNA - MEATBALLS

SUNDAY SAUCE & MORE














Tuesday, June 14, 2022

Frank Sinatra Bio

 



Francis Albert Sinatra






Francis Albert Sinatra

Bio


Francis Albert Sinatra was born December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was an American singer and actor. He is one of the best-selling music artists of all time, having sold an estimated 150 million records worldwide.

Born to Italian immigrants in Hoboken, New Jersey, Sinatra was greatly influenced by the intimate, easy-listening vocal style of Bing Crosby and began his musical career in the swing era with bandleaders Harry James and Tommy Dorsey. Sinatra found success as a solo artist after he signed with Columbia Records in 1943, becoming the idol of the "bobby soxers". Sinatra released his debut album, The Voice of Frank Sinatra, in 1946. However, by the early 1950s, his film career had stalled and he turned to Las Vegas, where he became one of its best known residency performers as part of the Rat Pack. His career was reborn in 1953 with the success of the film From Here to Eternity, his performance subsequently earning him an Academy Award and a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor. Sinatra then released several critically lauded albums, some of which are retrospectively noted as being among the first "concept albums", including In the Wee Small Hours (1955), Songs for Swingin' Lovers! (1956), Come Fly with Me (1958), Only the Lonely (1958), No One Cares (1959), and Nice 'n' Easy (1960).

Sinatra left Capitol in 1960 to start his own record label, Reprise Records, and released a string of successful albums. In 1965, he recorded the retrospective album September of My Years and starred in the Emmy-winning television special Frank Sinatra: A Man and His Music. After releasing Sinatra at the Sands, recorded at the Sands Hotel and Casino in Vegas with frequent collaborator Count Basie in early 1966, the following year he recorded one of his most famous collaborations with Tom Jobim, the album Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim. It was followed by 1968's Francis A. & Edward K. with Duke Ellington. Sinatra retired for the first time in 1971, but came out of retirement two years later. He recorded several albums and resumed performing at Caesars Palace, and released "New York, New York" in 1980. Using his Las Vegas shows as a home base, he toured both within the United States and internationally until shortly before his death in 1998.

Sinatra forged a highly successful career as a film actor. After winning an Academy Award for From Here to Eternity, he starred in The Man with the Golden Arm (1955), and in The Manchurian Candidate (1962). He appeared in various musicals such as On the Town (1949), Guys and Dolls (1955), High Society (1956), and Pal Joey (1957), winning another Golden Globe for the latter. Toward the end of his career, he frequently played detectives, including the title character in Tony Rome (1967). Sinatra would later receive the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award in 1971. On television, The Frank Sinatra Show began on ABC in 1950, and he continued to make appearances on television throughout the 1950s and 1960s. Sinatra was also heavily involved with politics from the mid-1940s, and actively campaigned for presidents such as Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan. He was investigated by the FBI for his alleged relationship with the Mafia.

While Sinatra never learned how to read music, he worked very hard from a young age to improve his abilities in all aspects of music. A perfectionist, renowned for his dress sense and performing presence, he always insisted on recording live with his band. His bright blue eyes earned him the popular nickname "Ol' Blue Eyes". He led a colorful personal life, and was often involved in turbulent affairs with women, such as with his second wife Ava Gardner. He later married Mia Farrow in 1966 and Barbara Marx in 1976. Sinatra had several violent confrontations, usually with journalists he felt had crossed him, or work bosses with whom he had disagreements. He was honored at the Kennedy Center Honors in 1983, was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Ronald Reagan in 1985, and the Congressional Gold Medal in 1997. Sinatra was also the recipient of eleven Grammy Awards, including the Grammy Trustees Award, Grammy Legend Award and the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. He was included in Time magazine's compilation of the 20th Century's 100 Most Influential people. After Sinatra's death, American music critic Robert Christgau called him "the greatest singer of the 20th century", and he continues to be seen as an iconic figure.






A Young FRANK SINATRA


EARLY LIFE

Francis Albert Sinatra was born on December 12, 1915, in an upstairs tenement at 415 Monroe Street in Hoboken, New Jersey,[8][9][b] the only child of Italian immigrants Natalina "Dolly" Garaventa and Antonino Martino "Marty" Sinatra. Sinatra weighed 13.5 pounds (6.1 kg) at birth and had to be delivered with the aid of forceps, which caused severe scarring to his left cheek, neck, and ear, and perforated his eardrum—damage that remained for life.

 Due to his injuries at birth, his baptism at St. Francis Church in Hoboken was delayed until April 2, 1916. A childhood operation on his mastoid bone left major scarring on his neck, and during adolescence he suffered from cystic acne that further scarred his face and neck. Sinatra was raised in the Roman Catholic Church.

Sinatra's mother was energetic and driven, and biographers believe that she was the dominant factor in the development of her son's personality traits and self-confidence.[20] Sinatra's fourth wife Barbara would later claim that Dolly was abusive to him when he was a child, and "knocked him around a lot".Dolly became influential in Hoboken and in local Democratic Party circles. She worked as a midwife, earning $50 for each delivery, and according to Sinatra biographer Kitty Kelley, also ran an illegal abortion service that catered to Italian Catholic girls, for which she was nicknamed "Hatpin Dolly". She also had a gift for languages and served as a local interpreter.

Sinatra's illiterate father was a bantamweight boxer who fought under the name Marty O'Brien. He later worked for 24 years at the Hoboken Fire Department, working his way up to captain. Sinatra spent much time at his parents' tavern in Hoboken, working on his homework and occasionally singing a song on top of the player piano for spare change. During the Great Depression, Dolly provided money to her son for outings with friends and to buy expensive clothes, resulting in neighbors describing him as the "best-dressed kid in the neighborhood". Excessively thin and small as a child and young man, Sinatra's skinny frame later became a staple of jokes during stage shows.

Sinatra developed an interest in music, particularly big band jazz, at a young age. He listened to Gene Austin, Rudy Vallée, Russ Colombo, and Bob Eberly, and idolized Bing Crosby. Sinatra's maternal uncle, Domenico, gave him a ukulele for his 15th birthday, and he began performing at family gatherings. Sinatra attended David E. Rue Jr. High School from 1928, and A. J. Demarest High School (since renamed as Hoboken High School) in 1931, where he arranged bands for school dances. He left without graduating, having attended only 47 days before being expelled for "general rowdiness". To please his mother, he enrolled at Drake Business School, but departed after 11 months. Dolly found Sinatra work as a delivery boy at the Jersey Observer newspaper, where his godfather Frank Garrick worked, and after that, Sinatra was a riveter at the Tietjen and Lang shipyard.He performed in local Hoboken social clubs such as The Cat's Meow and The Comedy Club, and sang for free on radio stations such as WAAT in Jersey City. In New York, Sinatra found jobs singing for his supper or for cigarettes. To improve his speech, he began taking elocution lessons for a dollar each from vocal coach John Quinlan, who was one of the first people to notice his impressive vocal range.



MUSIC CAREER


Sinatra began singing professionally as a teenager, but he learned music by ear and never learned to read music.[44][45] He got his first break in 1935 when his mother persuaded a local singing group, the 3 Flashes, to let him join. Fred Tamburro, the group's baritone, stated that "Frank hung around us like we were gods or something", admitting that they only took him on board because he owned a car[g] and could chauffeur the group around. Sinatra soon learned they were auditioning for the Major Bowes Amateur Hour show, and "begged" the group to let him in on the act.[47] With Sinatra, the group became known as the Hoboken Four, and passed an audition from Edward Bowes to appear on the Major Bowes Amateur Hour show. They each earned $12.50 for the appearance,[48] and ended up attracting 40,000 votes and won first prize—a six-month contract to perform on stage and radio across the United States.[49] Sinatra quickly became the group's lead singer, and, much to the jealousy of his fellow group members, garnered most of the attention from girls.[50][h] Due to the success of the group, Bowes kept asking for them to return, disguised under different names, varying from "The Secaucus Cockamamies" to "The Bayonne Bacalas".


In 1938, Sinatra found employment as a singing waiter at a roadhouse called "The Rustic Cabin" in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, for which he was paid $15 a week.[52] The roadhouse was connected to the WNEW radio station in New York City, and he began performing with a group live during the Dance Parade show.[53] Despite the low salary, Sinatra felt that this was the break he was looking for, and boasted to friends that he was going to "become so big that no one could ever touch him".[54] In March 1939, saxophone player Frank Mane, who knew Sinatra from Jersey City radio station WAAT where both performed on live broadcasts, arranged for him to audition and record "Our Love", his first solo studio recording.[55][i] In June, bandleader Harry James, who had heard Sinatra sing on "Dance Parade", signed a two-year contract of $75 a week one evening after a show at the Paramount Theatre in New York.[56][j] It was with the James band that Sinatra released his first commercial record "From the Bottom of My Heart" in July. No more than 8,000 copies of the record were sold,[60] and further records released with James through 1939, such as "All or Nothing at All", also had weak sales on their initial release.[61] Thanks to his vocal training, Sinatra could now sing two tones higher, and developed a repertoire which included songs such as "My Buddy", "Willow Weep for Me", "It's Funny to Everyone but Me", "Here Comes the Night", "On a Little Street in Singapore", "Ciribiribin", and "Every Day of My Life.

Sinatra became increasingly frustrated with the status of the Harry James band, feeling that he was not achieving the major success and acclaim he was looking for. His pianist and close friend Hank Sanicola persuaded him to stay with the group,[63] but in November 1939 he left James to replace Jack Leonard[k] as the lead singer of the Tommy Dorsey band. Sinatra earned $125 a week, appearing at the Palmer House in Chicago,[64] and James released Sinatra from his contract.[65][l] On January 26, 1940, he made his first public appearance with the band at the Coronado Theatre in Rockford, Illinois,[67] opening the show with "Stardust".[68] Dorsey recalled: "You could almost feel the excitement coming up out of the crowds when the kid stood up to sing. Remember, he was no matinée idol. He was just a skinny kid with big ears. I used to stand there so amazed I'd almost forget to take my own solos". Dorsey was a major influence on Sinatra and became a father figure. Sinatra copied Dorsey's mannerisms and traits, becoming a demanding perfectionist like him, even adopting his hobby of toy trains. He asked Dorsey to be godfather to his daughter Nancy in June 1940. Sinatra later said that "The only two people I've ever been afraid of are my mother and Tommy Dorsey". Though Kelley says that Sinatra and drummer Buddy Rich were bitter rivals, other authors state that they were friends and even roommates when the band was on the road, but professional jealousy surfaced as both men wanted to be considered the star of Dorsey's band. Later, Sinatra helped Rich form his own band with a $25,000 loan and provided financial help to Rich during times of the drummer's serious illness.

In his first year with Dorsey, Sinatra recorded over forty songs. Sinatra's first vocal hit was the song "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" in late April 1940. Two more chart appearances followed with "Say It" and "Imagination", which was Sinatra's first top-10 hit.[74] His fourth chart appearance was "I'll Never Smile Again", topping the charts for twelve weeks beginning in mid-July. Other records with Tommy Dorsey issued by RCA Victor include "Our Love Affair" and "Stardust" in 1940; "Oh! Look at Me Now", "Dolores", "Everything Happens to Me", and "This Love of Mine" in 1941; "Just as Though You Were There", "Take Me", and "There Are Such Things" in 1942; and "It Started All Over Again", "In the Blue of Evening", and "It's Always You" in 1943.[76] As his success and popularity grew, Sinatra pushed Dorsey to allow him to record some solo songs. Dorsey eventually relented, and on January 19, 1942, Sinatra recorded "Night and Day", "The Night We Called It a Day", "The Song is You", and "Lamplighter's Serenade" at a Bluebird recording session, with Axel Stordahl as arranger and conductor. Sinatra first heard the recordings at the Hollywood Palladium and Hollywood Plaza and was astounded at how good he sounded. Stordahl recalled: "He just couldn't believe his ears. He was so excited, you almost believed he had never recorded before. I think this was a turning point in his career. I think he began to see what he might do on his own".

After the 1942 recordings, Sinatra believed he needed to go solo, with an insatiable desire to compete with Bing Crosby, but he was hampered by his contract which gave Dorsey 43% of Sinatra's lifetime earnings in the entertainment industry. A legal battle ensued, eventually settled in August 1942. On September 3, 1942, Dorsey bade farewell to Sinatra, reportedly saying as Sinatra left, "I hope you fall on your ass", but he was more gracious on the air when replacing Sinatra with singer Dick Haymes. Rumors began spreading in newspapers that Sinatra's mobster godfather, Willie Moretti, coerced Dorsey to let Sinatra out of his contract for a few thousand dollars, holding a gun to his head. Upon leaving Dorsey, Sinatra persuaded Stordahl to come with him and become his personal arranger, offering him $650 a month, five times his salary from Dorsey. Dorsey and Sinatra, who had been very close, never reconciled their differences. Up until his death in November 1956, Dorsey occasionally made biting comments about Sinatra to the press such as "he's the most fascinating man in the world, but don't put your hand in the cage"








FRANK





to be Continued






The RAT PACK

FRANK SAMMY & DEAN